stringbook




........................................................................Home | Books | Bio | c.v. ............................. ... ...

A Book Report

A modest, humbled, celebratory thank you to those readers who have taken a chance and picked up a Kindle or Mac or iPad copy of The Plasma of Terror and even cracked open a cyberspine. I understand it's hard to tell how a book will do the first three months; and this one is in its second edition, waters even less chartered for me. Suffice it to say that after three weeks the book has eclipsed the sales it had in 2005, and I take that as a healthy trend.

The truth is, I probably should have done this earlier; I should have jumped on board the New Economy without such circumspection, and quietly thumbed my nose at the glacial editors in their glacier-carved town sooner still. The commercial eds I've worked with--not to spite them at all--have been masters of tradecraft to be sure. But bottom line is, they couldn't get done in a couple of years what I've been able to do in a couple of weeks. Noted. I have two other books in New York and if we happen to come to terms, great. If not, I'll build on this foray.

I've been dispatching pix from various promotional spots, and a few more stops in Southern California and even elsewhere are coming up. Promotion is, thanks to social media, is doubly promotional these days--you do something somewhere and you also show things online to others still. I am comfy with that. I don't consider myself much of a social media guy but the truth is that my connection to readers here in large measure owes to it, and so I certainly own that it does indeed "work"--whatever we call "work" is.

There's no shame necessary, I've discovered, in selling something--even in selling something to friends, even in selling something at $2.99. Some sell trust accounts, some sell produce, some sell antiques, and some sell books. To you who have taken the plunge or have simply been curious, thanks again, and I expect that soon there will be a little critical discussion to chew on too.

And if you don't pick up my book, or even if you do, there are some others by friends that are fantastic. Stephen Dumcombe's White Riot is precisely the mix of rock & roll & sociology that I think every single person who reads this site would love. Rodger Jacobs' and Matt Asprey's Jack London: San Francisco Stories is simply a Golden State must. These are the kind of books that live in the subterranean realm of creative anarchy; they are both strong challengers of the hidden curriculum, as well as blueprints for making a zazen of what we know of our always shocking cultural heritage.