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Swept Away


Moore points north...

"You're from Wayist? I love Wayist!" good-natured pasty-white-guy Kevin James told yours truly between innings at Clean Sweep, a town-hall-styled meeting dedicated to removing Councilmembers from office in 2011 and replacing them with grassroots candidates.

Over a hundred citizens including media types, one former Mayor, and many hyperlocal political organizers crowded the Mayflower Club on Victory Saturday afternoon to attend in knockout Valley heat that frazzled the wispy blond raggmop atop sportcoat-sporting Doug McIntyre's heat-flushed head.

Mayor Dick Riordan warmed the crowd with an old joke that flaunted his own senility.

Just before the Valley meeting, political consultant Mike Trujillo issued a denunciation of Walter Moore that event organizer Ron Kaye termed "an apparent try at a pre-emptive strike that only indicated they're worried." He countered Trujillo's charge that Moore is anti-Latino by pointing out how well Latinos were represented at the event.

Moore himself told the audience that "It will be important not to run any kooks" and also confessed to being nonplussed by the heat in the crowded hall.

John Thomas, a surprise on the program, who easily sported the best suit in the room possibly by a factor of ten, asked that the crowd not hold the fact that he's a political consultant against him. He will lend assistance to the nascent movement.

But the biggest story of the afternoon was the enthusiasm of the folks in the seats, some from neighborhood councils, some from blogs and newsletters, some from community organizations, who came and gladly contributed $20 in hope that the same kind of effort that led to the defeat of Measure B two years ago might make LA's City Council a different place next March.

"It felt different than one of those neighborhood council congresses," one noted to me after the event. "It had far more of a pulse. People really believe now that there's a chance something can be done about the corruption in City Hall."